Letter: Alexander Hamilton and A lesson in Humility from History

Alexander_Hamilton_portrait_by_John_Trumbull_1806

Dear Pilgrims, @citizentom @armourofchrist @melissapresser @neenergyobserver @neenergyobserver @njb4725 @servusfidelis

As I begin to wrap up my day working on my new project by trying to foster fraternity on the local community level by revamping my personal website. I wanted to share a particular conversation and personal story with a gentleman that I recently had via social distancing. We were discussing a particular person who in an attempt to show his intellectual prowess seemed set on correcting every small nuance.  I explained that I am sympathetic because I’ve been that guy and can still be that guy to this day.

I suppose feeling intellectually superior is a pride issue. It’s probably what infected AATW with the break up for the writers and with infection toward the end and beginning of this site. The exodus 90 disciplines have really spoken to me that in an attempt to belittle people with overcorrection, it has a lot to do with trying to control a particular situation and trying to control the perception of people around you. The thing about trying to give up control in these areas which wouldn’t normally be seen as area as problems is that one begins to be open to learning through discourse. When I listen only to reply to merely build myself up and tear down my intellectual opponent discourse ends and learning ends.

I can almost recall the exact moment when I decided to be that guy. For the longest time, I didn’t take my academic life seriously, until finally, I was in the midst of changing my habits. I had changed my major to history and focusing on the American Federalist Age. I was studying the Federalist Papers so fervently that I almost had some of them nearly memorized. And then it hit me, every time Alexander Hamilton walked into a room he (a) was the smarted guy in the room, (b) thought he was the smartest in the room, (c) both. Hamilton not only had those factors but he wanted other people to know them.  I remember walking into the classroom thinking, “I am the Alexander Hamilton of this room.” If you read any of Hamilton’s works, as an essayist, he is nearly unparalleled with tearing down his opponents’ arguments during the period. In fact, he’s a magnificent writer and nearly all of his work in regards to the Federalist Essays are first drafts, it’s astounding when you read them.

I’ve cooled off since that period, it’s been recent. So, fast-forward to the present, after observing the Hamiltonian streak in another peer, I made the comment in a discussion, I remember being thus, it doesn’t make you any friends.

I ended the conversation, “it’s no surprise, during the time, what happened in Weehawken.

Phillip

 

One thought on “Letter: Alexander Hamilton and A lesson in Humility from History

  1. Humility is a very subtle subject to be sure. A complete nitwit who has been taught the Truth by His Church or parents may no win an argument . . . but he will not lose the Truth unless he is a man without principles. Once Truth overcomes the soul the only thing you can do is to resist that which is not truth; even if it ends friendships or creates enemies. It does not mean that one has stopped loving their enemies for Christ told us that we must. So the seeds need planting when the facts of your opponent tell you that you are an ignoramus and that doing so is a fool’s errand.

    In my honest opinion that did not stop AATW: some of it was personal sin and the other component was a lack of interest in refighting old battles that had long been discussed in some depth.

    But the death knell of all death knells was the atheist invasion, all too ready to show everyone that they were smarter than everyone else. It is a hopeless task after one tries in vain to discuss the Truth that we have found. So we leave as foot soldiers for two different kings; The King of kings and the king of lies and deceit. It was time to go . . . and it may still be as we are not discussing anything even if we try to get on with current events rather than religion . . . or discuss ideologies and bearers of a new worldwide tyranny. I guess many don’t care to discuss it or to imagine it. It is easier to simply remain quiet.

    That is the death toll.

    Like

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